Last edited by Fetaxe
Wednesday, May 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Soil as a restrictive factor controlling the spread of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in the Sudbury Region found in the catalog.

Soil as a restrictive factor controlling the spread of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in the Sudbury Region

Ian Christopher Eix

Soil as a restrictive factor controlling the spread of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in the Sudbury Region

by Ian Christopher Eix

  • 338 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Laurentian University, Department of Biology in Sudbury, Ont .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementIan C. Eix.
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 33 l.
Number of Pages33
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20176363M

Predicting the spread of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in the Prairies. Canadian Field-Naturalist (4): – Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is an invasive plant introduced into North America in the early s. It has since spread into the prairie provinces of Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta). Lythrum salicaria is capable of invading a variety of wetland habitats, including marshes, river and stream banks, pond edges, lakes, road site ditches, and reservoirs. The plant prefers moist soil with neutral to slightly acidic pH. Once established, however, L. salicaria can exist in a wide range of soil types. Disturbed areas are more prone to invasion because exposed soil is ideal for.

  While out hiking at Pinckney State Recreation Area here in Michigan I came across a lot of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria, Lythraceae) in the wetlands. I also came across a lot of bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) feeding on the nectar of these plants and unwittingly pollinating loosestrife is invasive and these bees were unfortunately helping to spread it. Lythrum salicaria also occurs along stream and river banks and lake shores. In addition, the plant is found in ditches and other disturbed wet soil areas. Lythrum salicaria grows best in high organic soils, but tolerates a wide range of soils including clay, sand, muck, and silt (Thompson and Jackson ). Generally, the plant is found in full.

Impact and management of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) spread of purple loosestrife or to control existing populations using flooding, mow-ing, disking, burning and herbicide – with little or no effect (Thompson et al. ; L. salicaria establishment and dominance was lowest when soil fertility was low and and by: One of these pest weeds is the European purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), which was introduced in the early 19th century as an ornamental plant (Malecki et al., ). It has been spreading at a rate of , ha/year and is changing the basic structure of most of the wetlands it .


Share this book
You might also like
Encounter at dawn

Encounter at dawn

Student workbook for creative problem-solving courses and institutes

Student workbook for creative problem-solving courses and institutes

Original poems and others

Original poems and others

State-monopoly capitalism and the labour theory of value

State-monopoly capitalism and the labour theory of value

BFI summer schools 1971-1979

BFI summer schools 1971-1979

Thompsons coast pilot for the Upper Lakes, on both shores

Thompsons coast pilot for the Upper Lakes, on both shores

Emigration laws and policies of Albania, Kazakhstan, Kygzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan

Emigration laws and policies of Albania, Kazakhstan, Kygzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan

Undocumented aliens and crime

Undocumented aliens and crime

Somethings Out There! (Kentucky Boys Adventure)

Somethings Out There! (Kentucky Boys Adventure)

True color

True color

Supporting SME

Supporting SME

Soil as a restrictive factor controlling the spread of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in the Sudbury Region by Ian Christopher Eix Download PDF EPUB FB2

Spread, impact, and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American wetlands (SuDoc I ) [Thompson, Daniel Q.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Spread, impact, and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in Author: Daniel Q. Thompson. from the book. Weed Control in Natural Areas in the Western United States.

Purple loosestrife 3 of 3 Stalker, Chopper, Polaris. Remarks: Nonselective, long soil residual activity. Leaves more bare ground than other treatments, even a year after application.

Habitat. is an aquatic registered formulation available for use close to water. Impact, and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American Wetlands. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

55 pages. This resource should be cited as: Thompson, Daniel Q., Ronald L. Stuckey, Edith B. Thompson. Spread, Impact, and Control of Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American Wetlands. Spread, impact, and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American wetlands Volume 2 of Fish and wildlife research: Authors: Daniel Q.

Thompson, Ronald L. Stuckey, Edith B. Thompson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: Publisher: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Original from: University of Minnesota. This study evaluated the effectiveness of 14 herbicide treatments for purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) control over a period of 10 yr.

The study commenced in / at four wetland. Migration and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.) along highway corridors The soil-moisture content in the 0–20 cm soil layer was a driving factor for the α diversity.

Genus Lythrum can be annuals or herbaceous perennials, with simple leaves in opposite pairs and small star-shaped flowers in leafy racemes Details L.

salicaria is a robust herbaceous perennial with upright stems to m tall, clad in narrow, willowy leaves, and small vivid purplish-pink flowers 2cm wide in dense terminal spikes over a long period in summer. Spectacular when in full bloom, Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is a vigorous, upright perennial enjoying an extremely long bloom season from late spring to late summer.

It features pink, purple or magenta flowers in dense spikes, up to 18 in. long (45 cm) held atop lance-shaped leaves.

Recently, management of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), has been criticized for (1) lack of evidence demonstrating negative impacts of L. salicaria, and (2) management using biocontrol for lack of evidence documenting the failure of conventional control by: spread of L. salicaria (Malecki et al.

The acquisition of adaptive characteristics from native species of Lythrum may have enhanced purple loosestrife’s invasive success.

It will hybridize with Lythrum alatum, a widespread, native North American species, in natural settings. Under certain circumstances fertile hybrids are produced that can. Found in a wide range of soil textures and types: rock crevasses, gravel, sand, clay, and organic soils () Controlling the spread of plant invasions: the importance of nascent foci.

Journal of Applied Ecology. () Relationship between the abundance of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) and plant species. It is noted for attracting wildlife. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil.

Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist or wet soil and can grow in water.

In this study, we examined how environmental factors and differences among populations of Lythrum salicaria L. (Lythraceae; purple loosestrife) influenced the establishment of this species into both its preferred wetland habitat and secondary upland habitat. Seeds and seedlings from five parents from each of the three populations were planted in each wetland and upland of two sites in both disturbed Cited by: Summary of Invasiveness Top of page.

salicaria, an Old World native, is a highly invasive species of wetlands in North America, beginning to spread rapidly about years after its accidental introduction around It is a very variable species with an ability to occupy numerous habitats and substrates with the exception of dry places. Purple loosestrife flowers are very striking purple arranged on a spike.

Spread of purple loosestrife is primarily by seed, but the plant can also spread vegetatively from stem cuttings. Research at NDSU has shown that seed viability of purple loosestrife growing. Lythrum salicaria L. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Lythrum (family Lythraceae).

The record derives from WCSP (in review) (data supplied on ) which reports it as an accepted name with original publication details: Sp. Lythrum salicaria Purple loosestrife, a regulated Class B noxious weed, is a foot-tall perennial that grows on lakes and waterways throughout King County.

Simple, smooth-edged leaves grow opposite or whorled on stiff, sided stems. Lythrum salicaria L. – purple loosestrife Subordinate Taxa. purple loosestrife, lythrum. Category 2 noxious weed Nebraska. purple loosestrife North American Purple Loosestrife Control Contacts (LYSA2) The Nature Conservancy: Wildland Weeds Management & Research Program (LYSA2).

Purple Loosestrife. Lythrum salicaria L. Lythrum salicaria, known commonly as Purple Loosestrife, is an interesting species native not only to Australia but widespread in Europe, Asia and North is a herbaceous perennial related to Lagerstroemia (crepe myrtle) and known from ancient times.

Investigation of the meaning of the name leads back into the literature of many countries and. Soil pH to Wet to moist soil. Deadhead to prevent seed set and to keep tidy. Divide every coupl of years to aid in control. Propagate: Self seeds readily. Or by dividing at the beginning of spring. Miscellaneous: Can grow incredibly invasively, and growing it is banned in many areas; the plant is usually controlled by the use of beetles.

The loosestrife flower weevil Nanophyes marmoratusis a tiny weevil which lays a single egg in each flower. When the larvae emerge they eat the flowers' ovaries, and the plant is unable to create seeds.

The larvae usually proceed to hollow out the flower buds and use them as safe places to : Tracheophytes.Control. Biological Biological control agents do not eliminate the target weed, but when successful, can sup- press weed populations to a nonsignificant level (Rees et al.

). Five species of beetles have been approved for the biocontrol of Lythrum salicaria (Blossey et al ab).The Arrival. Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), a beautiful but aggressive invader, arrived in eastern North America in the early ’ were brought to North America by settlers for their flower gardens, and seeds were present in the ballast holds of European ships that used soil to weigh down the vessels for stability on the ocean.